[CfP] Edited Book Series: Korean Diaspora Across the World

Edited book series on Korean Studies in Communication

Korean diaspora across the world: Homeland in memory, imagination, and reality (tentative title)

Book editors: Dr. Eun-Jeong Han (Salisbury University), Dr. Min Wha Han (Independent Researcher), & Dr. JongHwa Lee (Angelo State University)

The 20th century witnesses diverse histories of Korean diaspora across the world. The history of each Korean diasporic community reflects complex sociopolitical contexts during the time of their migration and geographic movement. While histories of Korean diaspora are diverse and complex, there is one unique discursive and material reference point that situates, grounds, or anchors such complex and diverse diasporic experiences – their practices of longing, imagining, and negotiating “homeland.” Therefore, the discursive, material, and cultural practices (and performances) of “homeland” is the critical site of meaning construction and negotiation for each Korean community abroad.

This edited book intends to collect diverse voices of Korean diaspora across the world, tracing the meaning and the performance of ‘homeland’ for them. Positioning works on Korean diaspora within Communication Studies, this edited volume will foreground an interdisciplinary approach that covers multiple dimensions of issues and topics on Korean communities across the world. We invite chapter contributions from wide ranges of scholarly, epistemological, theoretical and methodological approaches.

Center questions that can be a focus for each chapter include the following but not limited:

  • What does “homeland” mean to the members of Korean community in diverse locations and contexts?
  • How is the notion of “homeland” related to one’s dialectical perceptions and experiences of belonging (vs. alienating), or participating (vs. resisting) in the host country?
  • How is the notion of “homeland” (de)constructed, remembered, (re)negotiated, practiced and represented among the members of Korean community, individually or collectively,?
  • How has the notion of “homeland” evolved and changed among generations?
  • How do national level history and geopolitical conflicts adhere the sense of the “homeland” and identity among the members of Korean community?
  • How do micro level history (i.g. family history) and personal memories reflect the sense of the “homeland” and identity among the members of Korean community?
  • How do various interethnic/intercultural relationships (i.g. interethnic marriage) contribute to the (de)construction, remembering, (re)negotiation, practice, and/or representation of “homeland” among the members of Korean community?
  • How does language contribute to the (de)construction, remembering, (re)negotiation, practice, and/or representation of “homeland” among the members of Korean community?
  • How do cultural space, practices and rituals contribute to the (de)construction, remembering, (re)negotiation, practice, and/or representation of “homeland” among the members of Korean community?
  • How does media contribute to the (de)construction, remembering, (re)negotiation, practice, and/or representation of “homeland” among the members of Korean community?

Editors are committed to accept chapters that address diverse voices of Korean diasporic communities across the world. If interested, please send an abstract (between 200 – 250 words) and CV by July 25, 2018 to Dr. Eun-Jeong Han (exhan@salisbury.edu). The final essay should be between 5000 – 8000 words total, plus references, tables, and figures. We are anticipating the submission of the first draft of all chapters by June 25, 2019.

Author: admin

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